In Person

Treasury Management Helps Banks Diversify Revenue

Treasury Management Helps Banks Diversify Revenue

Supporting the collections, disbursements, concentration, investment and funding activities of client companies are all under the purview of a bank’s treasury management department, a sector that may help banks diversify their revenue streams and bring in long-term, recurring revenue. For nearly a decade, Laurel Egan Kenny, founder and president of Turningpoint Communications, has been helping banks and the fintech companies that support them in the treasury space market their products to banks, as well as helping banks of all sizes grow and differentiate their treasury business. After leading marketing at State Street and what is now Santander in its treasury management and global trade divisions, Egan Kenny went out on her own. While every financial institution offers business banking solutions in one way or another, many smaller banks are following the larger players and investing in the creation or growth of their own treasury management divisions, an idea Egan Kenny believes is now crucial to a bank’s success.

With A Little Help, Banks Are Finding Their Creative Sides

With A Little Help, Banks Are Finding Their Creative Sides

Needham resident Bill Haynes started helping financial institutions with their communication efforts before there were any firms exclusively dedicated to that industry. After stints at the Boston-based insurance firm Scudder Stevens & Clark and in the public relations arm of Arnold Worldwide, Haynes seized on an opportunity he saw in the market and launched BackBay Communications.

Zooming In On The Local Picture

Zooming In On The Local Picture

Prior to her elevation to managing principal of Cushman & Wakefield’s New England operations in late May, Carolyn Sidor led the firm’s national specialty practice group operations. After years of substantial travel, taking charge of the company’s New England operations feels like a homecoming, said Sidor, a former executive at Colliers International and CB Richard Ellis, who joined Cushman & Wakefield in November 2012.

Putting The Puzzle Together

Putting The Puzzle Together

Given his profession, it’s perhaps fitting that Austin Shapard enjoys jigsaw puzzles in his spare time. He started working as a management consultant after business school, but soon pivoted to the asset management business.

At Home On The Market’s Highest End

At Home On The Market’s Highest End

Jonathan Radford is the top Coldwell Banker sale associate in New England. By focusing on the very high end of the market, he closed more than $107 million in sales last year without a team, a partner or even an assistant. Originally from England, Radford began selling real estate in France and joined Coldwell Banker when he came to Boston in 1998.

A One-Man Band

A One-Man Band

David Mahlowitz’s career taken him all over the real estate map – and the world. After growing up in Newton, where he has volunteered as an auxiliary police officer for the last 11 years, he worked as a loan originator and a real estate agent, and now practices real estate law in his own firm. He is a licensed airplane pilot who flew solo for the first time on his 16th birthday. He even competed in white-collar boxing exhibitions for charity while living and practicing law in China.

Keeping The Lights On Late In The South End

Keeping The Lights On Late In The South End

National Development has reinvented a tired 6-acre stretch of Boston’s South End with its 500,000-square-foot Ink Block development including luxury residences, trendy retail and an AC By Marriott hotel. While the Newton-based firm has benefited from the continuing urban renaissance, it’s just as active in the suburbs, with such projects as the repositioning of Burlington’s New England Executive Park as The District and redevelopment of a former Raytheon Corp. property in Sudbury. And it’s in permitting for a 300,000-square-foot redevelopment of a former Sam’s Club property in Natick for a hotel and active-adult residential community.